Creativity Works! supports the European Parliament’s inclusion of the cultural and creative sectors in the Horizon 2020 legislative proposal

18.12.2018

Creativity Works! is a leading European coalition of the cultural and creative sectors. Our coalition represents writers, screenwriters, video game developers, broadcasters, book publishers and retailers, cinema operators, sports organisers, picture agencies, music and film/TV producers, publishers and distributors.

Taking into consideration the vast contributions the  make towards Europe, we strongly support the two Industry, Trade and Research Committee (ITRE) reports on Horizon 2020 adopted last week by the European Parliament – MEP Dan Nica’s report on establishing Horizon Europe and MEP Christian Ehler’s report on establishing a specific programme implementing Horizon Europe. We call upon all EU policymakers to ensure the new Horizon Europe Framework Programme for Research and Innovation allocates a greater amount of funding to support key research needs for Europe’s cultural and creative sectors.

A funding boost for our sectors will enhance the high economic and societal value they already bring to Europe. In economic terms, our sectors have generated 12 million jobs and produced 4.4% of EU-wide growth in GDP. In societal terms, they foster diversity, promote ideas and strengthen social cohesion. Horizon Europe thus presents a unique opportunity to build on these benefits for European citizens, as well as facilitate future innovation in other areas. As outlined by Ehler’s report, this could help inspire “new technologies, business models and competences”.

Creativity Works! supports the European Parliament’s inclusion of the cultural and creative sectors in the Horizon 2020 legislative proposal.Click To Tweet

To achieve this end, we strongly support the reports’ introduction of a cluster “Inclusive and Creative Society” in Horizon Europe. This carveout would help satisfy the cultural and creative sectors’ R&D needs and their desire for innovation: ICT research, smart digital content, societal programmes and new technologies, all of which drive the creative process from start to finish. Risks taken by the cultural and creative sectors should also be more widely recognised and the difficulty in qualifying for R&D support schemes should be addressed. Project funding earmarked for connecting cultural heritage with emerging creative sectors, for instance, can help tap the unexplored potential of high-risk but high-value activities.

A further earmarking of funds for the development of a “European Cultural Heritage Cloud” (EUR 300mn in Nica’s report) would allow for the use of new technologies by our sectors and the ability to share know-how and skills that optimise the use of cloud services. This should aim to complement the Creative Europe programme already underway, which, while certainly helpful, remains insufficient at just .16% of the EU budget. To avoid duplication of funding schemes, clear synergies should be explored between these programmes.

Finally, we support the reports’ commitment to Horizon Europe funding for new technologies that help disabled persons overcome obstacles to the access and full participation of European culture. We firmly believe fair and equal access to the cultural, creative and educational value of our sectors, including through innovative research techniques, is essential for all Europeans to benefit from a truly inclusive society.

Sincerely,

Creativity Works!

About Creativity Works! 

Like-minded organisations, federations and associations from the European cultural and creative sectors have formed a coalition: Creativity Works!. Its objective is to foster an open and informed dialogue with EU policy-makers about the economic and cultural contribution made by creators and the cultural and creative sectors in the digital age. Members are brought together by a sincere belief in creativity, creative content, cultural diversity and freedom of expression.